Monday, March 23, 2009

Anger, Wolves, and Plaxo

Or: Why I Love The Internets (and the blogs that call them home)

Opened up a Plaxo friend request this morning from a name I didn't immediately recognize.

I have only sporadic contact with Plaxo, but, regardless of the network, I always open mysterious friend requests, always check and see if they're from people I should remember or maybe even people I should get to know.

Still didn't recognize the potential friend, but I did like the URL associated with his profile: greensoulshoes.org. So I clicked.

And found a link to his blog. And realized I'm pretty sure I've never met him. And noticed a couple of good post titles. And scrolled down to look at some more.

And found this, On Anger:

There is a Native American parable that goes something like this:

A child came home and told his grandfather how his classmates had ridiculed him and trashed his belongings. Hurt and angry, he told his grandfather how he hated them and wanted to hurt each with all his heart.

The Grandfather held the small boy and said, “I too have felt a great hate for those that have taken so much with little or no remorse. I have struggled with these feelings and it is as if there are two wolves fighting in my heart.”

He continued, “One wolf is noble, loving, and compassionate. He lives in harmony with those around him and is benevolent. The other wolf is vengeful, angry, and violent. He fights everyone because his hate consumes him. It is sometimes hard to live with these two wolves inside me, for both are skilled warriors and try to dominate my spirit.”

The boy looked up with quiet tears and asked, “Which wolf wins?”

The grandfather replied, “The one I feed.”

The social internets are that magnetic kind of dangerous. Weeks of our lives disappear in frenzies of tweets and comments and reference links and status updates. But, sometimes, when stars align just right, it takes less than five unintentional minutes to find a totally awesome wolf metaphor (and a new Plaxo friend).

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